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Video Gaming: The Sensitive Vision Of The Future

Learn Why Microsoft's Vision was turned away.

Spirited Away: A Timeless Masterpiece.

Find out why it's considered an all-time classic.

The Man on Fire.

Robert Downing Jr. Is the highest paid actor in Hollywood.

The Indie Corner.

In our Indie Corner feature this time around, "Valchion" is a 3D action adventure, with a retro twist.

World War Z: A Thrilling Experience

War World Z re-ignites the Infection genre.

Monday, December 9, 2013

The Video Game Chronicles



Check out our sister site, The VGChronicles. A site with an interesting perspective on Video Games. The interesting dialogue on the website are sure to entertain you for hours. Updated more frequently, and more stream-lined to deliver interesting narrative for games, both retrospectively, and presently. Have a look... You might stay a while.

http://www.thevideogamechronicles.com/

Sunday, December 8, 2013

Xbox Kinect Punishes You For Swearing Towards It


Apparently, In an effort to clean up language use during online interaction with other gamers, as well as, I suppose, clean up the general use of swear words during the course of game play, NBA 2K14 will issue you a technical foul, In real-time, for cussing at the television screen. The language is detected by either your Xbox's Kinect, or Sony's PS Camera on your Sony Console, and trigger an appropriate response by the officials, as If you were in the game, and directing your tirade at them.

Wednesday, November 27, 2013

New Blog Site: "Music And Chicks"



We will be soon revealing a new blog site, called "Music and Chicks." On this website, you can expect, well----what the title suggests. The latest and greatest music, as well as steaming hot vixens. Stay tuned as we update you on the progression, and final launch!


Tuesday, July 30, 2013

PS4 and Xbox 360 Controller Prices Revealed.


If you’re saving up for a next-generation console, then it’s also worth remembering that the $499.99 device comes with some additional costs. Accessories for the Xbox 360 and PlayStation 3, by and large, won’t work with the next generation, meaning that you won’t be able to use your old controllers to supplement the one that comes in the Xbox One box.
Microsoft on Monday released prices for new accessories, including its controllers, for pre-orders to give gamers a clue about what amounts they should set aside to make sure they can play with their friends.
New controllers will set you back $60 a piece, while a headset made to work with the new console costs $25. According to Microsoft’s Xbox Support Twitter feed, an Xbox One adapter for older headsets is in the works, but the company hasn’t offered more information on that ahead of the console’s planned launch in late 2013.

Microsoft is also taking pre-orders for its “Play and Charge” controller kit, which lets users ditch the double-AA’s in favor of a rechargeable battery pack. With a controller, the whole kit costs $75. If you just wanted the charging cable and battery pack separately, it’s $25.

The company is also offering a 12-month Xbox Live Gold membership for pre-sale, which will cost $60 and give players access to multiplayer gaming, entertainment and Skype. The Kinect, which has been one of Microsoft’s most popular Xbox peripherals, is now bundled with all new systems.
Meanwhile, Sony has said that the controller for its PlayStation 4 will also be $60 and is available for pre-order at Amazon, Walmart, Best Buy and GameStop. Sony’s PlayStation Camera, also $60, is also up for pre-order on those sites. Sony is including a mono headset with every system.

BMW Mass-Produces First Electric Car; Launches Q2 2014.


 via WallStreet Journal
BMW AG BMW.XE -0.26% Chief Executive Norbert Reithofer unveiled on Monday the auto maker's first mass-production electric car, saying his company would need to boost sales of plug-in and battery electric vehicles dramatically by 2025 to meet regulatory requirements.
The BMW i3 is expected to go on sale in the U.S. in the second quarter of 2014 where it is expected to be priced at $41,350 before federal tax and other incentives. An optional "range extender"—a small gasoline motor—will likely boost the price tag to $45,000.
 
BMW formally unveiled it's first mass-production electric car, which will serve as the immediate rival to the Tesla Model S in the plug-in luxury segment. Joe White joins Lunch Break from the BMW event. Photo: Getty Images.
Mr. Reithofer said he is taking a long view on the potential of electric vehicles.
"If you build such a car…you have to look into the future, 10, 15, 20 years," Mr. Reithofer said. "If you look around the world, [at] the emissions regulations, in the United States, in the European Union, even in China…cars like the BMW i3 are a must."
 
Dr. Norbert Reithofer, CEO of BMW, discusses the concept behind the new BMW i3 electric city car, set to go on sale in November, with prices starting from £25,680.
To comply with coming government emissions mandates, which in some regions require auto makers to achieve a certain percentage of sales from electric vehicles, Mr. Reithofer said, "we need about 30% plug-in hybrids and battery electric vehicles for the year 2025."
Mr. Reithofer boosted BMW's capital spending in 2012 by nearly 42%, and increased research and development spending by 17% to a total of nearly €9.2 billion ($12.2 billion). Earlier this year he told shareholders he intended to further increase spending on new technology. BMW has dedicated part of a factory in Leipzig to building the i3 and potential future plug-in models.
The i3, which starts at €34,950 in Germany, could lose €197 million a year on an operating basis, estimates Thomas Besson, an analyst at French brokerage firm Kepler Cheuvreux.

BMW's battery-powered i3 will run up to 100 miles on a charge.
Ian Robertson, BMW's global sales and marketing chief, said in London on Monday the company "would be profitable from day one on each vehicle it made." Other BMW executives said the i3's design drastically reduced the number of parts, allowing for savings on factory equipment. BMW developed with a partner a lower cost form of carbon fiber specifically for automotive uses, company officials said.

The car will earn emissions credits for BMW in markets such as California, reducing the likelihood that BMW will have to pay fines for failing to comply with carbon dioxide restrictions and giving BMW headroom under those rules to keep selling its more profitable internal combustion models.
Mr. Reithofer said he is "confident" that BMW can sustain growth in overall sales volumes in the second half of 2013, despite challenging market conditions in Europe. The BMW i3 won't contribute much to this year's sales figures because the car won't start hitting showrooms in volume until early 2014.

Others are planning pricey electric models. Daimler AG's Mercedes-Benz brand plans to launch an electric version of its B-Class compact next year, and General Motors Co.'s GM -0.79% Cadillac plans a plug-in hybrid based on the technology in the Chevrolet Volt. The head of Volkswagen AG's Audi brand said it may delay plug-in models until better battery technology is developed.
BMW's immediate rival in the plug-in luxury segment, particularly in the U.S. market, is Tesla Motors Inc. The Tesla Model S luxury sedan has up to 265 miles of driving range and starts at $69,900 before tax breaks.
Mr. Reithofer said the i3 is one of two "bookmarks" in the company's initial plug-in model strategy. BMW plans to launch next year a sportier cousin to the i3 called the i8, which will have an electric motor driving the front wheels and a three-cylinder gasoline engine driving the rear. Project director Ulrich Kranz said on Monday the plug-in hybrid i8 isn't a direct rival to the large Model S sedan.
"It's a super sports car," he said. The i8 will be smaller than the Model S, and will offer the driving dynamics of BMW's M3 high performance model but with the fuel efficiency of a small car, Mr. Kranz said.
Mr. Reithofer was cautious when asked if BMW plans a larger family of battery electric models. The i3 and i8 are a "good start," he said. "We'll look now into the year 2014 and '15 and then we will make decisions."
 
The new i3 is expected to be priced at $41,350 before incentives.
The BMW i3 was designed to be a lightweight, battery electric vehicle. The substructure of the passenger compartment is made from carbon fiber and the chassis is aluminum. BMW says it will offer fast charging capability.
The i3's unique structure makes possible novel features such as clamshell doors. BMW used dried grass to create a wood-like dashboard material, and recycled plastics are the raw material for the seats.
With electric vehicles, says Mr. Reithofer, "you need range. And if you use lightweight construction, range will be better." BMW officials say driving the i3 should convince prospective buyers that it is a better quality car than other lower-cost electrics.
BMW says the i3 will deliver 80 to 100 miles of driving between charges.The Fiat SpA's Fiat 500e, which starts at $32,600 before tax breaks, has a range of 87 miles. Nissan Motor Co.'s Leaf, which starts at just under $30,000, can go 75 miles, according to the Environmental Protection Agency's measures. General Motors' Chevrolet Volt can travel 38 miles on electricity, and 380 total once the gasoline engine kicks in.

Friday, July 26, 2013

One Hour Sit Down With Jay-Z; Interview Concerning Politics, Social Construction, And Zimmerman.


Elliot Wilson heads to the Bronx for an interview with Jay-Z. Sitting in the New York Yankees baseball museum at Yankee Stadium, Jay-Z speaks on "Magna Carta... Holy Grail"; new rules in the music business; his philosophy on collaborations; the connection he has to New York; and the future of rap. It is a hour long interview broken into two parts; you can watch them below:




How I accidentally Stumbled Acrossed The Most Underrated Videogame of All Time.



We were either in Funcoland, or something similar to a Target. In the DreamCast isle, surfing through titles. My brothers and I all carried differing tastes. Seldom did we agree on the same game, and when our father gave us the green light, we'd run off in separate directions in search of the next great experience. The thing was, rarely did our father let us purchase multiple games. Occasionally, but not in most cases. And that day was usual one game limitation. So, any time we were out with our father, two tasks always lied ahead of us. Two burdensome tasks. Well, three. But please, allow me to elaborate.

One, if you were one of us, you had to first choose a game. And there were hundreds to choose from. As a young, imaginative child, you'd find it cruel that your father is forcing you to choose between them all.

Two, after you, through pain-staking observations of the front cover art, narrow it down to about one or two, maybe three games. Now, you have the most difficult challenge of convincing your other two brothers, who had undergone the same deduction processes as you, that your selection should be sacrificed in favor of yours. And each of us believed our game choices were the best  one.

Three, you had to satisfy these politics all within a set time frame, before the father stepped in to deliver his arbitrary justice. And when he did, it was roulette concerning who would have their game chosen. Frequently a toss up, but normally, you could expect our father to inject some democracy into the debacle. Essentially, my father would sound the warning, "You three better decide on something." Which translated into, "If none of you can decide within the next ten minutes, we leave with nothing."

Normally at this declaration, one of us would crack, and take one for the team; smart enough to realize that any game was better than no game.

In this case, my brother Chris took the fall, and sided with me, as he joined my stare at a case cover that read "Shenmue". What caught my attention, however, was the font of the title, not the title itself. The letter styling was similar to that of "Virtua Fighter" . So much so, that I legitimately was convinced that we were looking at the popular fighting game. In my defense, I didn't actually know it was called Virtua Fighter; I didn't know what the fighting game went by. The only thing I did know at the time was that the font that read "Shenmue" was awfully similar to the font of the fighting game, and, convinced that this was that game, advertised it to the last remaining brother,

"This is that fighting game! Remember?! That Fighting game!"

He wasn't sold. Ironically enough, though, he would wind up loving the game more than my brother and I. But at the time, he was pissed he couldn't get what he wanted. In any event, it was two against one, so went purchased---Shenmue----then left. Me and my one brother were eager to get to fighting. When we owned PlayStation One, we played Tekken 3 religiously. Quite possibly one of the greatest fighting experiences ever. Virtua Fighter would be a change of pace as we would be introduced to new characters, and levels. Not to mention, the experience would be on an entirely new console.

Well, we arrived home, fired up the DreamCast, popped the bad boy in, and.......


Weird.... But.... Okay.... Pressing the start menu, and.....


Hm.... Don't quite recall the typical fighting game starting off with your home being ransacked, and men in black vans holding up the property. Must be a new age DreamCast type fighting game. Whatever. Let's get past this opening, and hit the character selection screen.


Wait, wait, wait... I just saw a gumball machine down the street... I can actually use it?? I don't imagine for a fighting weapon. And why do we have to play him? Where's the other characters? Why am I running around? Where's the PC opponent?

Okay, you get the point. Clearly, we weren't in Kansas anymore with this random game we had bought, believing it to be Virtua Fighter. But what it was, instead, was a much. much greater experience.

It was Shenmue. Yu Suzuki's love child for the Sega Dream Cast. And, quite possibly, the greatest underrated video game of all time.

Shenmue (シェンムー Shenmū?) is a 1999 adventure video game developed by Sega AM2 and published by Sega for the Dreamcast, produced and directed by Yu Suzuki. Suzuki coined a genre title for its nonlinear gameplay, "FREE" (Full Reactive Eyes Entertainment), for the game, based on the interactivity and freedom he wanted to give to the player. Suzuki intended to achieve this by simulating aspects of real life through the game, such as the day and night system, real-time variable weather effects (unheard of in a game of this kind at the time), fully voiced non-player characters with their own daily schedules, quick time events, and various other interactive elements such as vending machines, arcades, and convenience stores.

Shenmue borrows gameplay elements from several different genres, but largely consists of an open world adventure segments with real-time 3D battles interspersed throughout. It was the most expensive video game at the time, with a production cost of $47 million, equivalent to $64 million in 2011. The game was followed by a 2001 sequel, Shenmue II, with at least one more planned as a Dreamcast series. The budget for both games amounted to $70 million, equivalent to $95 million in 2011. However, production on the series ended with the second game, leaving the story at an unresolved cliffhanger.

If I hadn't confused this for Virtua Fighter, my brothers and I would've never had the privilege to ever play such am absolute masterpiece of a game. It was purely incidental... Yet of the greatest mistakes I've ever made.